African

Dreams Do Come True, pt. 2

  After dedicating twenty-three years to being a wife and mother, in 2004, Eleatta Diver's artwork began to occupy more space in her life.

She donated the proceeds from her Redemption series to the purchase of  the Merimbe House, a home on six acres where the African Children's Choir can take a few days to rest  in between concert dates.            

Durham Dreams

The idea of a dream series came to her. She could imagine herself  listening to people tell her about their dreams and she would put their story on canvas. She approached leaders  renovating downtown Durham, North Carolina and proposed that she  paint a canvas depicting the visions of twelve community leaders.The paintings would be her gift to the city. Durham Dreamers include the sheriff, a local minister, a historical preservationist and hip hop artists .Six of the proposed paintings are complete and have been unveiled. When the paintings are sold, the proceeds will be directed to a new Durham City dream. Once again, Eleatta gives her talents and time in an altruistic manner.

Dividends

Her expectation is that her "parables of hope"  touch the human heart. As people walk through her studio, she inquires, "What is your dream?" The question cracked the crusty exterior of one over-sized, burly man, and he responded, "No one has ever asked me that."

Diligence generates the fulfillment of a dream. As this full-time mom turned artist  dedicates herself to her  craft and the dreams of others, her stage grows. Her work is displayed and sold in a gallery in Norfolk, Virginia and her list of private clients who want to own their own dream portrait increases.

George Washington Carver once asked God to show him the secrets of the universe. Perceiving God's reply as a no,Carver sensed the direction that God would, however, show him the secrets of the peanut. In that one concentrated laser- like focus of effort, worlds of revelation and discovery were opened to Carver.The subject of dreams are my "peanut". Through painting, the exploration of human hopes and aspirations  provides endless opportunities to create visual parables that encourage  and inspire.

There's no expiration date on your dreams.

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Eleatta's blog is an oasis of inspiration offering insights into her latest pieces, surprise offers, as well as links to purchase prints.
To view a more thorough tour of Eleatta's painted parables, you may visit www.eleatta.com.
Images my not be copied or printed without permission of the artist.

 

Dreams Do Come True, pt. 1

As Eleatta makes others' dreams come true, her own dreams unfold.

On the third Friday of each month, Eleatta Diver can be found at Goldenbelt Art Studios in Durham, North Carolina on "open studio" night. You might witness the unveiling of her newest painting and if you want to chat with the artist, you can count on her asking,"What is your dream?"

Eleatta and her husband of twenty-nine years, Brian,  have five children. The older ones are  making their  mark in society while the youngest is in middle school. A home-schooling  mom,she made her family's needs the priority for twenty-three years.

Shift

Six years ago,  Eleatta's  art moved from the back burner of her life to the front. She began to create  from a new medium, trash. Soon after,  a series of events occurred that would make it clear  that her artwork was a catalyst for change .  King's Park International , the Diver's local church set a goal to purchase a home for the African Children's Choir , a troupe of  singing orphans  who perform concerts throughout the world.It was the desire of the church to provide them a home base  while they are in America, where they can rest, play and focus on their studies. Hence, the fund-raising began.

Eleatta saw the correlation between her medium of trash and these children,orphaned by AIDS and viewed by their countries' as disposable.  Discarded items  and the orphans could all be considered without value,but her creative eye saw what the founders of the choir saw.  Just like her trash was transformed into art she realized what  the children needed for transformation was for someone to look at them with a different eye. Eleatta chose to look beyond the obvious and into the potential. From that experience, the Redemption series was birthed.

"Redemption is a word that is pregnant with hope...it carries with it the idea of re-purposing or redefining...the assurance that something that is wrong can be made right.

Sales from the Redemption series were applied to the purchase of the Mirembe House, where the African Children's Choir enjoys rest on six acres when they are touring in the area. Eleatta's life as a working artist began when she availed her giftings to better the lives of others.

Look for Part 2  of Eleatta's journey on Thursday, Sept. 30th.

Eleatta's blog is an oasis of inspiration offering insights into her latest pieces, surprise offers, as well as links to purchase prints.
To view a more thorough tour of Eleatta's painted parables, you may visit www.eleatta.com.

To learn more about the Mirembe Capital Campaign, go to: http://www.kpic.org/ministries/missions/acc.html

Images may not be copied or printed without permission from the artist.

Hairstyle vs. Lifestyle

Hair style is the final tip-off whether or not a woman really knows herself.

Hubert de Givenchy

In the documentary Good Hair, Chris Rock investigates the marvel of African American women and their hair. He attempts to sell African American hair, only to hear vendors tell him it’s not Good Hair. He interviews women who pay $1000+ for hair pieces and sacrifice family necessities to have Good Hair.

In 1993, Dr. Jo Anne Cornwell, Associate Professor at San Diego State University launched Sisterlocks, a trademark company dedicated to empowering women to embrace their cultural roots by rejecting chemicals and processes that negate the natural state of their hair. Sisterlocks is a natural hair management system which allows women with tightly textured hair to take advantage of a wide range of today’s hair styles without having to alter the natural texture of their hair. Rather than processing the hair  to straighten it, Sisterlocks maximizes the natural characteristics of the hair.

Vivianne Pearson, Round Rock, Texas, noticed a co-worker's hair about two years ago. She was impressed with what looked like tiny braids in a uniformed pattern, only to find out they were not braids but Sisterlocks. She recently returned from Atlanta, Georgia where she attended a four-day training to become a Certified Sisterlocks Consultant. Not only is she enjoying a life free from chemicals, but celebrates the money she is saving. I love educating African American women about how to embrace their natural beauty.

Sisterlocks is not about a hairstyle, it's about a lifestyle.

-Sisterlocks

For information about Sisterlocks, contact Vivianne at lockcouture.com or 803-719-2632.