example

The Shark Tank

“In looking for people to hire, look for three qualities: integrity, intelligence, and energy.  And if they don’t have the first one, the other two will kill you.”   - Warren Buffet Last week as I stood in line at Target I chatted with a woman who was shopping with a daughter the same age as mine.  After a few minutes she asked where I worked and without thinking I answered, “A Shark Tank.”  We laughed and continued our conversation about snacks, short shorts and the long lines that seem to plague all California retailers.

I’ve only been in my new job for 6 months and while I’m enjoying the change of scenery, the change of pace and the new challenges my job has presented; this office has already left a bad taste in my mouth.  One of my first observations when I got here was that everyone was smart and ambitious, just like me.  However, there is a trait missing amongst some of my colleagues – integrity.

Trust and integrity take years to build; projects completed on time, fair prices and billing, promotions for those that work for you.  All it takes is one lie, one bad choice to destroy it all.  Having an “end justifies the means” mentality may get you the result you need in the moment but it could also be beginning of the end.

“Whoever walks in integrity walks securely, but he who makes his ways crooked will be found out.” Proverbs 10:9 (English Standard Version)

I see some of these people rewarded and I know who they have stepped on and over to get their results.  As much as I would love my share of the limelight I know that it’s a path I cannot choose.  When I first decided to take this job I’ll admit I was enticed by possibilities of promotions, new titles and more money.  I will always strive for more, to be better, to grow – it’s who I am, but it’s the path we choose that sets us apart.

“Better is a poor man who walks in his integrity than a rich man who is crooked in his ways.”  Proverbs 28:6 (English Standard Version)

It may take me longer to get where I want to be, but I have faith that things will happen as they should; and I can’t put a price tag on the example I set for my daughter.  At the young age of five, she sees, hears and absorbs everything.  When she is an adult I hope she can be proud of the decisions I’ve made and understand why I made them.

“The righteous who walks in his integrity— blessed are his children after him!”  Proverbs 20.7 (English Standard Version)

Stoplight Prayer:  Father in Heaven, Thank you for making me who I am and giving me direction and correction.  Help me to be a woman of integrity, a woman who lives her life in private the way she lives in public.

Real Girls Don’t Just Wear Pink

I love the fact that we bring awareness to Breast Cancer during the month of October by wearing pink and participating in different fund raisers and various events throughout the month.  However, what saddens me, to be honest, is many women participate in these activities, yet neglect their own health during the other 11 months.  Pink is pretty, but it takes a lot more than putting on a pink blouse, shirt or dress to take a stand to fight against cancer.  WHAT DOES IT TAKE?

It takes courage to do the “hard stuff”.  Those things that are not only hard, but often get neglected when a busy life gets in the way.

  • Exercise. Yes, it takes courage to exercise when there is the fear of failing or someone seeing you not looking your best. It takes courage to try something new by getting up a few minutes early for a work out before your day gets started.

 

  • Eating Healthy. Making the decision to overcome the temptation to grab the quickest thing to eat when not the healthiest, takes courage.  Yes, it takes some effort and hard work, sometimes to make the right decision for your body.

 

  • Regular Check Ups. Sometimes cancer still strikes when doing all of the right things.  That is why regular check ups and mammograms are the key to early detection and may be the thing that saves your life.  It can be scary, to make that appointment, but real girls become courageous when they conquer their fears.

When I think about making my 8 year old daughter aware about breast cancer, I have to laugh at the idea of getting her in anything pink. She is not a girly girl and I don’t think she owns anything pink.  

 

SO WHAT CAN I DO?

I can lead by example with exercise, eating healthy and getting regular check ups.  I want her to be a real girl of courage and do the right things that take care of her body, even though it may be hard at times. We may not be wearing that much pink at our house, but we are making a commitment to exercise together and eat healthy.

So I encourage you this year to stay aware and take action to fight breast cancer past the month of October.  

 

Mean Girls, Not In My House

While the movie is truly hysterical to watch (Mean Girls 2004), the theme is all too real for girls today and yesterday for that matter.  We are always trying to remain fashionable, wear nothing larger than a size 5-6 and have the right friends.  It’s unfortunate, but the reality is that many girls, to make sure that they feel good about their situation, will find someone worse off than them and make sure they know it. My daughter is only 4 years old, but as I watch her play on the playground at the park I can already see the beginnings of cliques forming.  The adorable little boy with the glasses swings alone, the girl with un-brushed hair tries desperately to make it pretty with her little fingers and still none of the kids go near her.  It’s sad to watch them draw these lines for themselves at such a young age but it’s worse when their parents do it for them.

Several months ago during a Mommy’s night out, a friend shared a story of how another parent had rudely snapped at her in the school parking lot.  After hearing the story I was appalled.  What gave this woman the right to snap at my friend for a reason that was none of her business?  I wanted so badly to never speak to her during pickup or let my daughter anywhere near her child again.

The next couple of times I saw her I found myself being short and abrupt, and then I realized what I was doing.  I was behaving like a child!  “You’re mean to my friend so I’m going to be mean to you”… what kind of example was I setting?  It wasn’t until a birthday party several weeks later that I found out her mother had been battling the final stages of breast cancer while she was working over seas for extended periods of time.  In fact, her mother had passed away only 2 days before.  I pray I never find out how I would behave if faced with a similar situation.

We all do the best we can for our children and for now I refuse to let my 4-year choose all of her friends.  My mother used to tell me “I can see farther than you,” and she was right.  When she’s older, I hope that her exposure to people of different colors, sizes, religions and economic backgrounds will give her the wisdom to surround herself with diverse friends.  The last thing I want to raise is a Mean Girl.